past events

Monday 09. July 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Mesoscopic Optics

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Sandoghdar Division

Speaker: Prof. Hui Cao (Dept. of Applied Physics, Yale University)

Place: MPL / seminar room (1.500)

Abstract:

Random scattering of light, e.g., in paint, cloud and biological tissue, is a common process of both fundamental interest and practical relevance. The interference of multiply scattered waves leads to remarkable phenomena in mesoscopic physics such as the formation of open and closed transmission channels. In applications, optical scattering is the main obstacle to imaging or sending information through turbid media. Recent developments of adaptive wavefront shaping in optics enabled imaging and focusing of light through opaque samples. By selective coupling to open or closed channels, we varied the transmission of a laser beam through a highly scattering system by two orders of magnitude, and drastically changed the energy density distribution inside the system. Furthermore, by adding optical gain to a disordered medium, we realized random lasing and demonstrated its application to speckle-free full-field imaging. Finally, we developed a fast and efficient method of switching the spatial coherence of a laser, and applied it to multimodal microscopy.

Friday 06. July 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
10dB vacuum noise squeezing at 1064 nm for gravitational wave detection

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Leuchs Division

Speaker: Prof. Ray-Kuang Lee (National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan)

Place: MPL / seminar room (1.500)

Abstract:

In this talk, I will report our recent implementation of squeezed vacuum states, at 1064 nm through a bow-tie optical parametric oscillator (OPO) cavity and our home-made balanced homodyne detectors. Applications of our squeezer to the gravitational wave detection will be discussed​, with the collaboration with Japanese KAGRA project (Kamioka Gravitational wave detector, Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope). At the same time, development on the monolithic PPLN for squeezer in an integrated chip will be also addressed.

 

 

Thursday 05. July 2018

MPL Distinguished Lecturer Series
Magnetism in Quantum Gases

 

Talk by: Prof. Dan Stamper-Kurn (Berkeley University)

Place: MPL (seminar room 1.500)

Abstract:

With quantum gases, one can explore magnetic ordering and dynamics in regimes inaccessible in solid-state systems. For example, in degenerate spinor Bose gases, magnetization of the atomic spin is established along with Bose-Einstein condensation, allowing minute spin-dependent energies to dictate the magnetic ordering of the gas. The extreme isolation of the atomic system allows us to populate the magnetic superfluids with magnetic excitations, and observe their coherent dynamics and eventual re-condensation. A second cold-atom material, in which atoms are confined within the periodic potential of an optical lattice, bears a stronger resemblance to condensed-matter systems. I will present progress to explore the effects of geometric frustration with cold atoms that are confined in a twodimensional kagome optical lattice.

Tuesday 26. June 2018

IMPRS monthly meeting

 

Organisation: Sona Davtyan (MPL/ Russell Division)

Talk: Mid-infrared Raman lasers based on gas-filled hollow-core silica fibers

Speaker: Dr. Alexey V. Gladyshev (Fiber Optics Research Center of the Russian Academy of Science, Moscow)

Place: MPL / library 2.500

Abstract:

The Lecture is devoted to the development of Raman fiber lasers that generate in 3 – 5 µm spectral range. This part of the spectrum is usually thought of as inaccessible by fiber lasers based on fused silica glass, as fused silica has strong fundamental absorption at wavelengths above 3 μm. Nevertheless, the results to be presented on the Lecture demonstrate that gas-filled hollow-core silica fibers extend applicability of silica fiber technology towards mid-infrared spectral range.

Wednesday 06. June 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Monolithically Integrated 3D Silicon Photonic Platforms

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Russell Division

Speaker: Prof Joyce Poon (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Canada)

Place: MPL / seminar room (1.500)

Abstract:

This talk presents my group’s progress in foundry-compatible, monolithically integrated multilayer silicon nitride-on-silicon (SiN-on-Si) photonic platforms.  These SiN-on-Si photonic platforms contain several waveguide levels, and light can be routed vertically between the layers to realize 3D photonic devices and circuits.  I will present our work on passive and active elements, including ultra-low-loss waveguide crossings, multi-layer grating couplers, polarization management components, and ultra-efficient Si depletion modulators.  These advancements make possible the implementation of very large-scale photonic circuits for applications such as optical switching, phased arrays, and dense sensor systems.

 

Monday 28. May 2018

MPL Alumni Seminar
How to leap from academia into industry successfully?

 

Organisation: The hBar Omega Student Chapter

Alumni: Dr. Bettina Heim (Optical AIT Engineer at OHB System AG) and Dr. Benjamin Sprenger (Sales Engineer at Menlo Systems)

Place: MPL / seminar room 1.500

Topic:

When making the transition from the world of academic research to industry many questions arise:

How should I approach possible employers? How do I use my professional network most efficiently when searching for a job? 

How can I present myself and my skills in the best light? How does the working life in industry looks like? 

 

 

Thursday 24. May 2018

IMPRS monthly meeting - CHANGED DATE!

 

Organisation: Gaetano Frascella (MPL/ Russell Division)

Talk: Quantum sensing beyond limits

Speaker: Prof. Ulrik Andersen (Technical University of Denmark)

Place: MPL / library 2.500

Abstract:

What is quantum sensing? Is entanglement or squeezing needed? These are questions that I will touch upon in my talk. In addition, I will present new results on distributed sensing and teleportation based sensing.

 

 

Friday 11. May 2018

MPL Distinguished Lecturer Series
Quantum Effects in the Motion of Surprisingly Large Objects

 

Talk by: Prof. Jack Harris (Yale University)

Place: MPL, seminar room 1.500

Abstract:

The theory of quantum mechanics is believed to describe nearly all physical phenomena. It is embedded in our understanding of the universe and much of the technology that enables modern society. At the same time, some features of quantum mechanics strongly contradict physical intuition. These features (such as entanglement, measurement back-action, and zero-point energy) are routinely observed in the behavior of very small objects. Their seeming absence in large objects can be understood within quantum theory, but still raises questions: Are there limits to the size of an object that can exhibit quantum effects? If so, what can we learn from these limits? If not, what new technology might be enabled by macroscopic quantum phenomena? In this talk I will discuss these questions from the perspective of the field known as “quantum optomechanics”, and will describe my lab’s experiments on quantum effects in the motion of millimeter-sized objects.

Wednesday 09. May 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Topological physics with coupled oscillators: beyond Berry's phase via exceptional points

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Marquardt Division

Speaker: Jack Harris (Yale University)

Place: MPL / seminar room (1.500)

Abstract:

A system that consists of a small number of linearly coupled, classical simple harmonic oscillators is often considered to be trivial. Thus it was remarkable when Berry and others showed that the phases of such oscillators possess robust geometric and topological features. More recently it has been appreciated that introducing dissipation into such a system opens an entirely new form of topological control. This "non-Hermitian" control has a novel feature: it can operate on the oscillators' energy (rather than their phase). In this talk I will describe how it is that dissipation (which is usually a disadvantage) results in a qualitatively new form of topological control. I will also describe the realization of these effects in a simple optomechanical system.

 

 

Wednesday 09. May 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Designing optical and optoelectronic responses in materials

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Leuchs Division

Speaker: Prof. Andrew M. Rappe (University of Pennsylvania, USA)

Place: MPL / library (2.500)

Abstract:

Next-generation optical and optically-enabled information technologies rely on the cultivation of a new generation of materials that offer excitations that can be manipulated with light. In this talk, I will discuss materials with dramatically tunable optical (linear and nonlinear) and optoelectronic responses that depend sensitively on light frequency, optical polarization, and propagation direction. Electronic topological band theory and response function analysis point to new functional optical and optoelectronic opportunities.