past events

Thursday 13. September 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Simulation of the Pre-Compensation for Atmospheric Turbulence for Ground-to-GEO Optical Feederlinks

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Leuchs Division

Speaker: Conrad Rößler (Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF, Jena)

Place: MPL / library (2.500)

 

 

Thursday 30. August 2018

IMPRS monthly meeting

 

Organisation: Michael Moser (FAU/ ECAP)

The plan is:

To have a research lab tour at Siemens Healthineers in the Siemens campus, visiting the group of Dr. Karin Söldner, who is heading the development of X-Ray Tubes for CTs.

The tour will consist of an introduction to the development of X-Ray Tubes at Siemens, a stroll through the laboratories and a Q&A session

Time frame:

2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. (meeting at 1:50 p.m. sharp)

Where to go:

Günther-Scharowsky-Straße 21, 91058 Erlangen (Meeting point: https://goo.gl/maps/LpscgGaCe9U2)

If you are interested in joining the research lab tour, please register until August 16th (more details are in the e-mail that Michael sent round).

Tuesday 31. July 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Quantum behavior and thermodynamics at the nanoscale

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Marquardt Division

Speaker: Dr. Stefan Nimmrichter (National University of Singapore)

Place: MPL / seminar room (1.500)

Abstract:

The predictions of quantum mechanics extend far beyond the atomic scale they were originally intended for. By now, we are able to observe and analyze quantum superpositions, interference, and entanglement in mechanical degrees of freedom at the nanoscale, using molecular matter waves, atomic condensates, mechanical resonators, and soon also levitated nanospheres and rods. This raises fundamental questions about the transition from quantum behavior and the quantum statistics of many-body systems to classical mechanics and macroscopic thermodynamics. Is it a continuous transition where quantum phenomena gradually disappear under the growing influence of environmental interactions and limited measurement precision? Or could there be a hard border between the quantum and the classical world, which is constituted by “macrorealistic modifications” of quantum theory prohibiting macroscopic quantum behavior beyond a certain mass or time scale? By which standard do we speak of macroscopic quantum behavior?

In this talk, I will present pragmatic ways to tackle these questions. On the one hand, I will discuss an empirical, hypothesis test-based measure of macroscopicity for quantum experiments. On the other hand, I will explore thermodynamics on the quantum scale by means of open quantum models for classically inspired thermal machines such as a three-spin absorption refrigerator or an optomechanical rotor heat engine. Their performance and the validity of the underlying open quantum system description will be addressed.

 

 

Friday 20. July 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Molecules in a Quantum-Optical Flask

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Sandoghdar Division

Speaker: Dr. Tal Schwartz (School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University)

Place: MPL / seminar room (1.500)

Abstract:

Interactions of molecules with light play a fundamental role in nature, where photons usually act on the molecules and drive chemical reactions and other processes. However, when brought into the realm of cavity quantum electrodynamics, the light and the molecules start to behave as a single entity, having its own properties. This concept lies at the heart of an emerging field known as polaritonic chemistry, which provides us with new tools for controlling the properties of molecules. In my talk I will discuss the advances that had been achieved in this field during the past few years, as well as our current efforts for controlling molecular processes by strong coupling and several fundamental physical questions which are still open.

 

 

Thursday 19. July 2018

IMPRS monthly meeting

 

Organisation: Thorsten Goebel (FSU)

Talk and lab tours in Jena!

Programme:

07:30                   Departure from Erlangen (MPL)

10:00 – 10:45     Arrival in Jena

10:45 – 11:45     Lab Tour Joachim (Development of high average power ultrashort pulsed fiber laser systems)

11:45 – 12:45     Lunch

13:00 – 14:30     Presentation by Prof. Dr. Stefan Nolte

14:30 – 15:15     Lab Tour Victor (Development of high power cw fiber laser systems for industrial applications)

15:15 – 16:00     Lab Tour Thorsten (Fiber Bragg gratings – Application as tailored in-fiber reflectors  for fiber lasers or as transmission filters for astronomy; further topics available if enough time is left)

16:30                    Departure from Jena

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 18. July 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Quantum Nanoplasmonic Optics for Molecular Precision Medicine

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Sandoghdar Division

Speaker: Prof. Luke P. Lee (University of California, Berkeley)

Place: MPL / library (2.500)

Abstract:

Molecular electron transfer (ET) essentially involves in virtually all biological processes such as photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, cellular homeostasis, cell death, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. However, there is no real-time monitoring method of molecular ET in live cells.

In this talk, I will present first quantum biological electron tunneling (QBET) junctions for in vivo ET imaging in living cells. QBET junctions are formed by nanoplasmonic optical antennas, molecular barriers, and biomolecules for the real-time display of cellular galaxy.

Second, I will discuss and in vitro application of quantum plasmonics. For molecular precision medicine in the palm of hand, ultrafast photonic PCR system on chip is accomplished. Rapid precision molecular diagnostic system comprises three key elements:

(1) photonic amplifications of NA biomarkers;

(2) signal amplifications of protein biomarkers;

(3) a self-contained sample preparation and liquid biopsy on chip, which allows a speedy sample-to-answer readout platform.

Third, I will also present current progress of 3D organoids microphysiological analysis platforms (MAP) with biophotonic imaging and modulation of signaling pathways, as an active molecular life on display. Organoids MAPs are established to provide physiologically relevant microenvironments by controlling both signaling pathways and physiological dynamic flows. Since ubiquitous fluid dynamics plays important role in shaping ontogeny of living systems, we created dynamic MAPs to model human organ development and various human pathogenesis for personalized medicine. The organoid MAP provides an ideal model to address fundamental questions of molecular organogenesis as well as flow-induced epigenetic gene expressions. In addition, patient-derived organoids can recapitulate patient responses and help personalized therapy.

Current development of mini-brains MAP, pancreatic islets MAP, and kidney organoids MAP will be discussed along with the vision of real-time non-invasive QBET imaging in organoids: visualizing the invisible electron transfer behavior and the dynamics of redox enzyme electron transfer in live organoids. Molecular life on display and organoids MAP by the convergence of biology, chemistry, physics, and technology will impact on life sciences and molecular precision medicine.

 

 

Friday 13. July 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Non-equilibrium statistical physics for small quantum systems: Transport, fluctuations and Engineered devices

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Marquardt Division

Speaker: Prof. Bijay Agarwalla (IISER-Pune, India)

Place: MPL / seminar room (1.500)

Abstract:

I will talk about two different aspects of nonequilibrium statistical physics:
1) Engineered light-matter open quantum systems and microscopic principles for photon amplification.
2) A brief overview of quantum transport including universal fluctuation relations, thermodynamic uncertainty and effects of electron-phonon interaction on charge transport.

 

 

Thursday 12. July 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Avoiding thermal noise in photonic up-converters: Can a mm-wave detector's sensitivity approach the quantum limit at room temperature?

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Leuchs Division

Speaker: Gabriel Santamaria (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

Place: MPL / library (2.500)

Abstract:

Room-temperature detection of mm-wave and THz radiation can be performed in the optical domain by porperly up-converting the signal with efficient electro-optic modulators made of nonlinear crystals. As the parametric up-conversion is intrinsically noiseless, the noise performance of such a receiver concept will be ultimately limited by the conversion efficiency (shot noise) as well as the ambient and internally-generated thermal radiation (thermal noise). High-Q whispering-gallery resonators allow for efficient up-conversion by pumping them with continuous-wave laser sources of just few milliwatts of power, in presence of a mm-wave resonant mode. On the other hand, the mm-wave mode in the crystal can be strongly decoupled from the thermal bath provided that the crystal has low absorption at such frquencies. In this talk, we discuss the advances in whispering-gallery-based electro-optic modulators, and show promising techniques for approaching the conversion efficiency to unity.

Additionally, we make a thermal noise study of the concept, and show that it can be significantly reduced by designing properly the geometries of both, resonator and coupler, such that the THz mode is radiatively cooled. Moreover, some approaches currently under research to achieve broadband up-conversion are discussed. Due to its high sensitivity at room temperature, this technique finds applications of technological and scientific interests such as radio astronomy, earth observation and planetary missions.

 

Tuesday 10. July 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Quantum simulation: platforms, algorithms, applications

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Marquardt Division

Speaker: Dr. Oleksandr Kyriienko (Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stockholm, Sweden)

Place: MPL / seminar room (1.500)

Abstract:

In the talk I will discuss the evolution of the field of quantum simulation. First, I will introduce the general concept of a quantum simulator – a well-controlled quantum setup which can mimic the behaviour of a complex system of interest. Next, the variety of the quantum optical systems will be presented, and the advantages and drawbacks for different platforms will be elaborated. In particular, I will consider superconducting qubits as highly scalable and rapidly developing platform for quantum simulation, and consider its challenges. Then, the general algorithmic approaches and state-of-the-art protocols will be reviewed. Finally, I will discuss two concrete examples of new quantum simulation strategies, corresponding to: 1) Floquet approach applied to material science models and 2) ground state estimation with analog quantum chemistry simulators. In addition, the future goals and directions in the field will be presented.

 

 

Monday 09. July 2018

LECTURE ANNOUNCEMENT
Mesoscopic Optics

 

Organisation: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light / Sandoghdar Division

Speaker: Prof. Hui Cao (Dept. of Applied Physics, Yale University)

Place: MPL / seminar room (1.500)

Abstract:

Random scattering of light, e.g., in paint, cloud and biological tissue, is a common process of both fundamental interest and practical relevance. The interference of multiply scattered waves leads to remarkable phenomena in mesoscopic physics such as the formation of open and closed transmission channels. In applications, optical scattering is the main obstacle to imaging or sending information through turbid media. Recent developments of adaptive wavefront shaping in optics enabled imaging and focusing of light through opaque samples. By selective coupling to open or closed channels, we varied the transmission of a laser beam through a highly scattering system by two orders of magnitude, and drastically changed the energy density distribution inside the system. Furthermore, by adding optical gain to a disordered medium, we realized random lasing and demonstrated its application to speckle-free full-field imaging. Finally, we developed a fast and efficient method of switching the spatial coherence of a laser, and applied it to multimodal microscopy.